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These 5 tricks help your fragrance last longer…

Ever had a favourite perfume that just wont last on your skin? Find out why and follow our five tops tips, below, to make your scent stick around…

Why does my perfume ‘disappear’ so quickly?

From the moment you apply: the top notes, or ‘head’ notes last around 5-15  minutes before they disappear. Yet another reason why you should never judge a perfume as soon as you’ve sprayed! The middle (heart) notes last from two to four hours, and convey the main character of the fragrance. The base notes or “dry down” usually lasts from four to six hours.

Perfume likes to ‘cling’ to skin, so they tend to last far longer on oilier-complexioned people. The strength of the fragrance is also a factor, and so are the notes:  deep, smouldering base notes – the woods, resins, leather and tobacco etc. – are ‘heavier’ in structure, so evaporate more slowly. A citrus-fresh cologne will never last as long as an Oriental eau de parfum.

Perfume can last four to six hours (or even longer), depending on the strength of the juice you’re spritzing, how dry your skin is or even what the weather’s like – perfumes dissipate much faster on dry skins, or when the air is particularly dry. But what can you do if, even in winter, your scent is scarpering more quickly than you’d like?

How can I make my perfume last?

1 Use matching body products, if available, or unscented if not – it’s a beautiful way to ‘layer’ on your fragrance; body creams and body lotions, in particular, add emollients which hold perfume.  If these range extensions aren’t available, go for an unscented body cream, butter or lotion which won’t clash with your chosen scent. Think of it as a primer for perfume.

2 Switch to a stronger formulation. Eau de parfum, pure parfum and extrait are highly concentrated formulas that will smell stronger and last longer. They may be more expensive, but you can end up using far less. Win-win!

3 Try spraying your hair as well as your skin – though be careful if the perfume is dark in colour as you may unintentionally dye your hair! (Test on a tissue, first.) Hair is porous and will waft the scent even longer than on your skin in many cases.

4 Spritz a scarf with with scent and the heat of your body will make the fragrance bloom. Also a handy way to try a new fragrance you’re not sure of. Bored of it? Simply take the scarf off and try something else…

5 Remember that the nose becomes desensitised and quickly gets used to the notes of your perfume. Although you may not be able to smell it at all after 30-40 minutes, your friends and colleagues may still be able to, so maybe ask a friend if they can still smell it before dousing yourself again (tempting as we find it!)

Written by Suzy Nightingale

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